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CARACAS, Thursday October 24, 2013 | Update
 
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Ramonet rules out "military intervention" in Venezuela

Ignacio Ramonet, the director of monthly newspaper "Le Monde Diplomatic" in Spanish, finds absurd to say there is no freedom of press in Venezuela. He compared late President Hugo Chávez and President Nicolás Maduro with late Chilean President Salvador Allende. With their socialist ideas, the three of them have faced "a local and powerful oligarchy that always questions their legitimacy," he claimed

EL UNIVERSAL
Thursday October 24, 2013  01:57 PM
Late Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez is a "giant in the history of Latin America," and the continuity of "Bolivarianism," which inspired Venezuela and other countries in the region, will depend on Chávez's successor, Nicolás Maduro, said Spanish journalist Ignacio Ramonet.

In his book, entitled Hugo Chávez. Mi primera vida (Hugo Chávez. My first life), Ramonet told EFE he intended to show "a more human perspective" of the late president. Ramonet's perspective sought to stand in opposition to the "highly hostile speech" used to refer to Chávez and describe how Chávez eventually became a leader.

When asked about Maduro, the author underscored that despite the importance of the Armed Forces, Chávez "chose a civilian; it is a test to Bolivarianism (...) if he does a good job, he will ensure the continuity of the ‘Bolivarian revolution.'"

"There is no one else like him in the heart of chavezism," Ramonet claimed referring to Nicolás Maduro, whom he described as a "serious, honest, and solid man." He added, "I do not think a military intervention will take place in Venezuela."

The director of monthly newspaper "Le Monde Diplomatic" in Spanish found it "absurd to say that there is not freedom of press in Venezuela. He compared late President Hugo Chávez and President Nicolás Maduro with late Chilean President Salvador Allende. With their socialist ideas, the three of them have faced "a local and powerful oligarchy that always questions their legitimacy," he claimed.

Referring to Maduro's tenure, Ramonet underlined that for the first time, Venezuela has waged a war against corruption and public insecurity. By doing this, Maduro "has made new enemies."

Translated by Jhean Cabrera
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