ESPACIO PUBLICITARIO
CARACAS, Wednesday September 11, 2013 | Update
 
|
share
|

Vargas Llosa: Venezuela is a total disaster, a chaos

"(Venezuela) is a country that, instead of moving forward, is going backwards; it features the highest inflation rate in Latin America," Peruvian writer Mario Vargas Llosa stressed. He is worried about Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro maintaining "the messianic ideas" of his predecessor (late President Hugo Chávez)

For Vargas Llosa, Venezuela’s case is “tragic” (AP)
EL UNIVERSAL
Wednesday September 11, 2013  12:58 PM
Peruvian writer Mario Vargas Llosa is "very concerned" over the direction Venezuela has taken over the last years, and remarked that the country "is a total disaster, a real chaos; where demagogy, corruption, and violence abound."

"(Venezuela) is a country that, instead of moving forward, is going backwards; it features the highest inflation rate in Latin America," Vargas Llosa remarked in an interview with news agency Efe apropos the publication of his new novel "El héroe discreto (The discreet hero)" in Spain, Latin America, and the United States. As usual, the writer seized the opportunity to give his opinion about current issues.

He asserted that, unlike his country, Peru, and other Latin American countries, whose economic situation have improved; Venezuela is "a negative exception" to that outlook.

"Venezuela's case is rather tragic," the writer asserted. He is also worried about Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro maintaining "the messianic ideas" of his predecessor (late President Hugo Chávez) to turn Venezuela "into a headlight, an example" for other countries.

"However, I'm afraid that Venezuela is rather the exception to the rule. Nowadays, there are more countries in Latin America where democracy is developing, featuring modern economic policies which are leading to progress and development," Vargas Llosa remarked.
|
share
|
ADVERTISING SPACE
Dossier
Living with HIV/AIDS (II)

At first she agreed that I use her real name, that she had no problems with that at all. After all, living with HIV had driven her to help others – as a workshop facilitator giving talks and conducting seminars, or as a volunteer for local AIDS Service Organizations like Acción Solidaria (Solidary Action) and Mujeres Unidas por la Salud (Women United for Health, or Musa), a support group network for HIV-positive women. But when we were well into the interview, the realization that she might lose her private health insurance coverage made her change her mind.

 
Cerrar
Abrir