ESPACIO PUBLICITARIO
CARACAS, Monday July 08, 2013 | Update
 
|
share
|

Criminalization of right to protest rejected in Venezuela

The Venezuelan Program of Education-Action in Human Rights (Provea) informs about anti-protests laws

Marino Alvarado, Provea’s coordinator (File photo)
YANETH FERNÁNDEZ |  EL UNIVERSAL
Monday July 08, 2013  10:31 AM
Criminalization of labor protests by some pro-government sectors has been one of the main issues subject to discussion among trade unions and non-governmental organizations, which fear escalation.

For eight years, protests have been shifted from being a right to an offense via statutory law, the Venezuelan Program of Education-Action in Human Rights (Provea) contends.

Provea's Coordinator Mariano Alvarado says there are at least eight laws providing sanctions for workers calling or participating in a strike.

Nevertheless, the Bolivarian Workers' Union of Venezuela argues that not all labor conflicts are legal. Its president, Wills Rangel, has pointed out that a large number of claims are politically driven. He explained that requests for salary adjustment of 150% show, for instance, unwillingness to negotiate.

Translated by Jhean Cabrera
|
share
|
ADVERTISING SPACE
Dossier
Living with HIV/AIDS (II)

At first she agreed that I use her real name, that she had no problems with that at all. After all, living with HIV had driven her to help others – as a workshop facilitator giving talks and conducting seminars, or as a volunteer for local AIDS Service Organizations like Acción Solidaria (Solidary Action) and Mujeres Unidas por la Salud (Women United for Health, or Musa), a support group network for HIV-positive women. But when we were well into the interview, the realization that she might lose her private health insurance coverage made her change her mind.

cerrar