ESPACIO PUBLICITARIO
CARACAS, Monday July 08, 2013 | Update
 
|
share
|

Criminalization of right to protest rejected in Venezuela

The Venezuelan Program of Education-Action in Human Rights (Provea) informs about anti-protests laws

Marino Alvarado, Provea’s coordinator (File photo)
YANETH FERNÁNDEZ |  EL UNIVERSAL
Monday July 08, 2013  10:31 AM
Criminalization of labor protests by some pro-government sectors has been one of the main issues subject to discussion among trade unions and non-governmental organizations, which fear escalation.

For eight years, protests have been shifted from being a right to an offense via statutory law, the Venezuelan Program of Education-Action in Human Rights (Provea) contends.

Provea's Coordinator Mariano Alvarado says there are at least eight laws providing sanctions for workers calling or participating in a strike.

Nevertheless, the Bolivarian Workers' Union of Venezuela argues that not all labor conflicts are legal. Its president, Wills Rangel, has pointed out that a large number of claims are politically driven. He explained that requests for salary adjustment of 150% show, for instance, unwillingness to negotiate.

Translated by Jhean Cabrera
|
share
|
ADVERTISING SPACE
Dossier
Whose victim am I?

They are marching in step to the same tune. There is a coordinated effort to position the idea. The Twitter hashtag  #YoSoyVictimaDeLaGuarimba (I'm a victim of "guarimbas", or protest barricades) can be read on all pro-government Twitter accounts, including those of the ruling United Socialist Party of Venezuela (PSUV), the National Assembly's Press Office, the state-run food distribution network PDVAL, state airline Conviasa, the Venezuelan embassies in foreign countries, radio stations and the huge media network responsive to the Government's interests and messages.

 Ranking
  •  Read 
 
cerrar