ESPACIO PUBLICITARIO
CARACAS, Monday July 08, 2013 | Update
 
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Criminalization of right to protest rejected in Venezuela

The Venezuelan Program of Education-Action in Human Rights (Provea) informs about anti-protests laws

Marino Alvarado, Provea’s coordinator (File photo)
YANETH FERNÁNDEZ |  EL UNIVERSAL
Monday July 08, 2013  10:31 AM
Criminalization of labor protests by some pro-government sectors has been one of the main issues subject to discussion among trade unions and non-governmental organizations, which fear escalation.

For eight years, protests have been shifted from being a right to an offense via statutory law, the Venezuelan Program of Education-Action in Human Rights (Provea) contends.

Provea's Coordinator Mariano Alvarado says there are at least eight laws providing sanctions for workers calling or participating in a strike.

Nevertheless, the Bolivarian Workers' Union of Venezuela argues that not all labor conflicts are legal. Its president, Wills Rangel, has pointed out that a large number of claims are politically driven. He explained that requests for salary adjustment of 150% show, for instance, unwillingness to negotiate.

Translated by Jhean Cabrera
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María Fernanda Astudillo is a store analyst for Alimentos Polar working at the company's facilities in La Yaguara. At only 23 years of age, she has made a career in that company where she has worked for the last six years. Now, besides her responsibilities, which include overseeing shipping/receiving and warehousing of goods, she is taking part in the roundtable discussions among the other companies operating in the La Yaguara industrial park, the Government and the workers exploring possible ways of coping with the order to expropriate the land.

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