ESPACIO PUBLICITARIO
CARACAS, Friday June 28, 2013 | Update
 
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DIPLOMACY | He reiterated offer to provide humanitarian asylum

Venezuela voices solidarity with Ecuador for support to Snowden

Hailing Edward Snowden for his revelations about an alleged espionage web in the United States, Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro supported his Ecuadorian counterpart Rafael Correa for taking a firm stance vis-à-vis the warnings from Washington

Maduro: Venezuela is willing to provide humanitarian shelter to this brave young man (VTV)
EL UNIVERSAL
Friday June 28, 2013  07:22 AM
Once again, Edward Snowden, a former agent and expert of the CIA, was on the agenda of Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro, who said Thursday night that, if requested humanitarian support or asylum for Snowden, Venezuela would not hesitate to grant it.

In this regard, hailing Snowden for his revelations, Maduro said he supported President of Ecuador Rafael Correa for taking a firm stance vis-à-vis Washington's warnings against Ecuador if it granted asylum to the former agent.

According to Maduro, the world should closely monitor the situation and the attempts to create a system to "spy" on everyone.

"If this young man needs humanitarian protection and thinks he can come to Venezuela (...), Venezuela is willing to protect this brave young man in a humanitarian manner and for humankind to know the truth and put an end to this," said Maduro.

The Venezuelan president said Snowden mirrored the "rebellion of truth" and a "phenomenon that expresses something that is happening with US youth."

President Correa reported alleged US pressure, such as threats that Washington would remove tariff preferences, if Ecuador grants asylum to Snowden. "I congratulate President Correa for he acted courageously today," Maduro said.
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The behind-the-scenes of the events of April 11, 2002

Alarmed because of the emotional breakdown suffered by his ally and his destiny; Fidel Castro requested asylum for deceased Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez in Madrid back on April 11, 2002. "The story had been much darker and more entangled than what some people's imagination has wanted to believe in and disclose," former Spain's President, José María Aznar, upholds in his autograph book published by late 2013.

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