ESPACIO PUBLICITARIO
CARACAS, Tuesday January 29, 2013 | Update
 
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CHÁVEZ'S HEALTH

VP Maduro claims that President Chávez "clings to Christ and life"

The senior officer said that President Hugo Chávez is optimistic and confident of his treatment

"Sooner than later we will have the commander back" (Photo: TV screen capture)
EL UNIVERSAL
Tuesday January 29, 2013  02:36 PM
Venezuelan Vice-President Nicolás Maduro quoted on Tuesday President Hugo Chávez's comments, which, according to him, were made during the latest visit by government authorities.

"As you know, our president commander is fighting a complex, tough battle, but with a tremendous mood," Maduro said.

"I am very optimistic and fully confident of the treatments undergone; we will win this one again; I cling to Christ and life,' he told us with strength of spirit before bidding farewell the day (Executive Vice-President) Elías (Jaua) and I were leaving for Chile," the vice-president related.

Maduro noted as well that the president "is fully informed" about "the battle staged by our people and armed forces" against "ambushes."

Recognition at Celac

Vice-President Maduro expressed his satisfaction and claimed to be proud of the "recognition" voiced by several Latin American and European leaders of "the binding action" pioneered by President Chávez.

"In the discussions at Celac, virtually all ministers and prime ministers acknowledged the role played by President Hugo Chávez, who paved the way –under his binding leadership, wittiness and perseverance- to the establishment in Venezuela of the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States one year and two months ago."

"Sooner than later, we will have the commander back; take note of that; that is written down in the history," Maduro admonished.

@ocarinespinoza
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