ESPACIO PUBLICITARIO
CARACAS, Sunday December 16, 2012 | Update
 
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ELECTION 2012

17 million voters can change the share of the provincial power

A total of 23 governors and 260 members of legislative councils are to be elected on Sunday, December 16

As many as 23 state governors and 260 members of legislative councils are to be elected on Sunday, December 16 (File photo)
EUGENIO G. MARTÍNEZ |  EL UNIVERSAL
Sunday December 16, 2012  06:45 AM

On Sunday, December 16, Venezuelans have the opportunity either to reassert the local control of Chavezism and let the dissent preserve its share of power, or change the structure of the country territorial control.

Four years ago, 76% of elected public offices went to the government hands. In this way, the candidates supported by President Hugo Chávez won 17 state governments, 263 mayoralties and 178 positions in legislative councils.

Unlike the last local election, this time no mayors will be elected. This means that 17,381,601 Venezuelans have been called to legitimize 260 elected public offices. In the case of representatives to state parliaments, 54 legislators by list, 175 by individual vote and eight indigenous delegates should be chosen. The latter will be selected only in eight states: Amazonas, Anzoátegui, Apure, Bolívar, Delta Amacuro, Monagas, Sucre and Yaracuy.

133 different ballots

In this election, each state is divided into constituencies. This means that not only the number of votes has changed, but also the design of the e-ballot.

While a state is one constituency only, where the state governor is elected, is order to choose the members of legislative councils, constituencies comprise several municipalities of one single state or the sum of municipalities and parishes.

The basic difference among constituencies is the number of lawmakers to be elected by name as representatives at the legislative councils. For this reason, each voter will cast from two to six votes.

emartinez@eluniversal.com
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Is protest over?

That political protest in Venezuela has lost momentum seems pretty obvious: people are no longer building barricades to block off streets near Plaza Francia in Altamira (eastern Caracas), an anti-government stronghold; no new images have been shown of brave and dashing protesters with bandanna-covered faces clashing with the National Guard in San Cristóbal, in the western state of Táchira; and those who dreamed of a horde of "Gochos" (Tachirans) descending  in an avalanche to stir up revolt in Caracas have been left with no option but to wake up to reality.

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