CARACAS, Monday December 10, 2012 | Update

Former justices: Maduro is the acting head of State

Former Venezuelan magistrates asserted that in fact Chávez delegated his powers

Although the Parliament rejected the term absence, former justices of the Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ) believe that Vice-President Nicolás Maduro is the acting President of Venezuela (Photo: AVN)
Monday December 10, 2012  01:07 PM
The Venezuelan Parliament once again rejected using the term "temporary absence" to refer to the absence of Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez, who returned to Cuba to undergo cancer treatment. However, both the way the leader informed about his trip to Cuba and the fact that he appointed Vice-President Nicolás Maduro as his political successor clearly imply he has handed over all his powers.

"This time is different from what has happened before. The president considered a scenario in which he may end up being physically or mentally unable to be in office. Thus, this time there are more reasons to believe that the Presidency is vacant and, therefore, Vice-President Maduro must fill that position," former justice of the Electoral Chamber of the Supreme Tribunal of Justice (TSJ) José Peña Solís stated.

Similarly, a former magistrate and former president of the Academy of Political and Social Sciences, Román Duque Corredor, underscored, "The president said he would request permission to be absent for a few days. Automatically, a temporary substitution applies, accordingly. However, he admitted that his health conditions may prevent him from holding office. Therefore, he has admitted that he is physically unable to continue performing his duties."

Translated by Jhean Cabrera
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