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CHÁVEZ'S HEALTH

Chavez's Health: A chronology

EL UNIVERSAL
Sunday December 09, 2012  12:23 PM
From June 8 to July 4, 2011 (26 days): Subsequent to landing in Cuba while on an international tour- Venezuela's President Hugo Chávez has some medical tests done and on June 10, he undergoes emergency surgery of a "pelvic abscess," claims Foreign Minister Nicolás Maduro that very day. Unofficially, on June 20, it is known that he gets surgery again to be removed a cancerous tumor. On June 30, the Head of State discloses to the country that he had two surgeries.

From July 16 to July 23, 2011 (seven days): He travels authorized by the Parliament in order to start a chemotherapy treatment. He then reports that "no malignant cells were found" in his body.

From August 6 to August 14, 2011 (eight days): He gets back to Cuba for a second chemotherapy session.

From August 27 to September 2, 2011 (six days): He continues his treatment but this time in Caracas. He is admitted to the Military Hospital to initiate the third chemotherapy session.

From September 17 to September 22, 2011 (five days): He comes back to Cuba to receive the fourth and last cycle of chemotherapy.

From October 16 to October 20, 2011 (four days): He returns to Havana for a comprehensive checkup, which in his own words- showed "no active malignant cells" in his body.

From February 18 to February 19, 2012 (one day): He secretly travels to Cuba for a  checkup, but it is on February 21, when he discloses about his trip to the country and reports that an "lesion" was detected on the same spot where the cancerous tumor was resected; therefore, he needs another surgery.

From February 24 to March 16, 2012 (21 days): He gets back to the Caribbean island in order to undergo surgery for the third time, on February 27.

From March 24 to March 29, 2012 (five days): He returns to Cuba to start radiotherapy.

From March 31 to April 4, 2012 (four days): He comes back to the Caribbean island in order to receive a second session of radiotherapy.

From April 7 to April 11, 2012 (four days): He gets back to Havana for the third cycle of radiotherapy.

From April 14 to April 26, 2012 (12 days): He travels authorized by the Parliament for the fourth radiotherapy session.

From April 30 to May 11, 2012 (11 days): He travels again authorized by the National Assembly in order to initiate the fifth and sixth cycles of radiotherapy.

May 11, 2012: He returns to Venezuela and announces he has successfully completed his radiotherapy cycle.

May 22, 2012: He reappears in public holding a meeting with his cabinet after days of convalescence.

June 2, 2012: The president is seen as the presidential house hosting Belarusian Deputy Prime Minister Vladimir Shemanshko.

July 1, 2012: Amid concerns over his health conditions and seeking his reelection, the Venezuelan leader starts his presidential campaign.

October 7, 2012: Chávez is reelected (2013-2019) with 55 percent of the votes versus 44 percent of his challenger Henrique Capriles Radonski.

November 27, 2012: The president is authorized to travel to Cuba to undergo hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

December 7, 2012: After going through therapy for nine days, the leader returns from Cuba. No information about his health condition had been released prior to his arrival.

December 8, 2012: Chávez announces he will undergo a new surgery upon the emergence of inflammation and pain in the affected area. In the event he is unable to take office for the new presidential term next January 10, and in the event a new presidential election is held, the president has proposed the presidential candidacy of Vice-President Nicolás Maduro, the right man for his succession.

Translated by Adrián Valera Villani and Jhean Cabrera
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Living with HIV/AIDS (II)

At first she agreed that I use her real name, that she had no problems with that at all. After all, living with HIV had driven her to help others – as a workshop facilitator giving talks and conducting seminars, or as a volunteer for local AIDS Service Organizations like Acción Solidaria (Solidary Action) and Mujeres Unidas por la Salud (Women United for Health, or Musa), a support group network for HIV-positive women. But when we were well into the interview, the realization that she might lose her private health insurance coverage made her change her mind.

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