ESPACIO PUBLICITARIO
CARACAS, Thursday April 26, 2012 | Update
 
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Chávez's Health | Unlike previous times, his arrival was not broadcast live on state television

Chávez arrives in Venezuela; no formal address delivered

Unlike other times, state-run television channel VTV broadcast at 1:30 am a video footage of Hugo Chávez s arrival. The Venezuelan president would not deliver a formal address to the country, as he usually does. He told official media that during the flight from Havana to Caracas he talked with Foreign Minister Nicolás Maduro about the new labor law

He was welcomed by some members of his cabinet (Handout photo)
ALEJANDRA M. HERNÁNDEZ F. |  EL UNIVERSAL
Thursday April 26, 2012  08:31 AM

President Hugo Chávez arrived early on Thursday in Venezuela, after spending 12 days in Cuba, where he underwent a fourth cycle of radiotherapy sessions.

It was 12:55 am when state-run television channel Venezolana de Televisión (VTV) anounced the arrival of the Venezuelan Head of State at the Simón Bolívar International Airport in Maiquetía, where he was welcomed by some members of his cabinet.

Unlike other times, VTV did not broadcast live the arrival of the Venezuelan president. Instead, the state-run network broadcast at 1:30 am a video footage showing the arrival of Chávez, who would not deliver a formal address to the country, as he usually does.

However, in the video footage broadcast by the state television channel, Chávez was heard greeting his ministers and saying: "The rebellious April is ending, and May -the month of the working class- is about to begin."

During the flight from Havana to Caracas, he talked with Foreign Minister Nicolás Maduro about the new labor law, Chávez told official news agency AVN.

Around 9:20 pm on Wednesday, the Venezuelan president announced via Twitter that he would return to Venezuela in the next few hours.

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The end of a cycle

Hundreds of thousands of demonstrators took to the streets of Brazil on March 13 to demand the ouster of embattled President Dilma Rousseff, carrying banners expressing anger at bribery scandals and economic woes. A banner read "We don't want a new Venezuela in Brazil."

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