ESPACIO PUBLICITARIO
CARACAS, Monday January 09, 2012 | Update
 
|
share
|
Diplomacy | According to a video, the diplomat played a role in an alleged plot to launch cyber-attacks

US expels Venezuelan consul general to Miami

Attacks would target computer systems at the White House, the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Pentagon, the National Security Agency (NSA) and nuclear power plants. Livia Acosta Noguera must leave the US by Tuesday, a US State Department spokesman said

Livia Acosta Noguera was given 72 hours to leave the United States (Handout photo)
EL UNIVERSAL
Monday January 09, 2012  10:35 AM


The US Department of State said that it declared Venezuela's consul to Miami Livia Acosta Noguera persona non grata, and has given her until Tuesday to leave the country, according to US State Department spokesman for Latin America William Ostick.

Venezuela's embassy in Washington D.C. received the official notification on Friday and the consul "should leave the United States by January 10," Ostick said, as reported by Efe.

According to the US diplomat, the expulsion was decided in accordance with Article 23 of the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations.

According to diplomatic standards, the US does not have to discuss the reasons for the expulsion; the move follows a documentary broadcast in late 2011 which links Acosta Noguera with an alleged plot to launch cyber-attacks on computer systems of the US government, along with Cuban and Iranian agents.

According to a documentary entitled "The Iranian Threat," produced and broadcast by Univision network, the plot started at least five years ago. Based on the tape, the consul, who was at that time the cultural attaché at the Venezuelan Embassy in Mexico, met in Mexico with former teachers and graduates from the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) who pretended to be hackers and managed to record several talks where the diplomat requested information on the alleged plot against the United States to deliver it to Venezuela's President Hugo Chávez

The cyber-attacks would target computer systems at the White House, the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Pentagon, the National Security Agency (NSA) and nuclear power plants.

|
share
|
ADVERTISING SPACE
Dossier
The end of a cycle

Hundreds of thousands of demonstrators took to the streets of Brazil on March 13 to demand the ouster of embattled President Dilma Rousseff, carrying banners expressing anger at bribery scandals and economic woes. A banner read "We don't want a new Venezuela in Brazil."

fotter clasificados.eluniversal.com Estampas
Alianzas
fotter clasificados.eluniversal.com Estampas
cerrar