ESPACIO PUBLICITARIO
CARACAS, Thursday February 28, 2013 | Update
 
|
share
|
FINANCE

Venezuela is the only petro-state with a debt over 50% of the GDP

Venezuela is back to the indebtedness period of the 1980s

Unable to borrow any further to expand expenditure, the government has devaluated again the local legal tender (File photo)
VÍCTOR SALMERÓN |  EL UNIVERSAL
Thursday February 28, 2013  12:43 PM
Fully aware of the high volatility of oil prices, most petro-states, except for Venezuela, have been prudent during this protracted oil boom; set up  savings funds and kept their debts at comfortable levels.

Based on statistics from the International Monetary Fund, Venezuela's debt by the third quarter of 2012 accounted for 51% of the gross domestic product (GDP).

Most petro-states have focused on bringing down their debt, namely Saudi Arabia from 65% of the GDP in 2004 to 5.5% in 2012; Kuwait, from 18.5% to 7%; Iran, from 25% to 11%; Angola, from 54% to 28%; and Nigeria, from 53% to 15%.

It is worth noting that Venezuela's recent devaluation of the bolivar at nearly 46% leads to a heavier burden of the debt as the GDP measured in US dollars drops and in practice more bolivars are required to pay liabilities in US dollars. 

Today, Venezuela's debt amounts to 70% of the GDP.

From 1974-1977 and then from 1979-1981, oil prices skyrocketed, bringing high income in turn. Amid high expenditure, the country ended up taking on large debts that resulted in a heavy burden in view of the country's GDP. When oil prices plunged, international banks stopped financing Venezuela and the poverty rate soared.

Similarly, Hugo Chávez's government has raised its debt amid high oil prices, the highest ever seen. Indeed, the Venezuelan oil basket averaged USD 100 per barrel in 2011-2012.

Translated by Jhean Cabrera
|
share
|
ADVERTISING SPACE
Dossier
The behind-the-scenes of the events of April 11, 2002

Alarmed because of the emotional breakdown suffered by his ally and his destiny; Fidel Castro requested asylum for deceased Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez in Madrid back on April 11, 2002. "The story had been much darker and more entangled than what some people's imagination has wanted to believe in and disclose," former Spain's President, José María Aznar, upholds in his autograph book published by late 2013.

 Ranking
  •  Read 
 
fotter clasificados.eluniversal.com Estampas
Alianzas
fotter clasificados.eluniversal.com Estampas
cerrar