ESPACIO PUBLICITARIO
CARACAS, Friday January 18, 2013 | Update
 
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ECONOMY

Industry commodity stocks average 1.5 days amid restrictions

The Venezuelan Chamber of Food Processing Industries (Cavidea) says the Superintendence of Silos, Warehouse and Agricultural Storage is in charge of food distribution

Cavidea to propose the Executive Office policies to secure food production and distribution (File photo)
ANGIE CONTRERAS |  EL UNIVERSAL
Friday January 18, 2013  03:49 PM

The Venezuelan Chamber of Food Processing Industries (Cavidea) dismissed accusations of hoarding and speculation voiced by Government officials, who have blamed the sector's enterprises for shortage in staples. 

Cavidea's CEO Pablo Baraybar said that plants resumed operations this week and they are working at their full capacity. He added that operations have also restarted for food distribution and 82% of the available transport is already operating. "Commodities are now available in stores."

Baraybar explained that failures in the supply of products early this year have been the same over the last five years. Stocks have run low because distributors would rather avoid charges of hoarding.

As a result, restrictions in food warehouses restrain enterprises from meeting the demand or dealing with low distribution, particularly in holidays.

Cavidea will propose the Executive Office softening restrictions in the stock of products so that industries and stores can maintain stocks for at least 4-5 days.

Furthermore, Cavidea remarked that food supply depends on the Government. The Superintendence of Silos, Warehouse and Agricultural Storage (SADA) is the Government's institution that decides where products are to be distributed. In fact, the priority is to supply the Metropolitan Area of Caracas.

Translated by Jhean Cabrera
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