ESPACIO PUBLICITARIO
CARACAS, Monday November 12, 2012 | Update
 
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ECONOMY

Communes await authorization by Venezuelan Government

Forty communes look forward to receiving authorization in Lara state, northwest Venezuela

From 2008-2011, some USD 292.16 million has been approved for the execution of 5,450 social programs (Photo: AVN)
MARLA PRATO |  EL UNIVERSAL
Monday November 12, 2012  01:19 PM
The Venezuelan National Assembly (AN) continues laying the foundations for the communal State.

On October 20, during a meeting of ministers, President Hugo Chávez urged his cabinet to speed up the establishment of communes.

To date, in the state of Lara, northwest Venezuela, only two communes have been duly registered and more than 40 are still in progress, 11 of which are directly being encouraged by the Communes Ministry.

Meanwhile, Luis Reyes Reyes, a ruling party PSUV' member running for governor in Lara state, said last week that the creation of the communal state is directly linked to the duly incorporation and development of the communes. Thus, it will take some years more to complete. 

Five thousand projects in three years

From 2008-2011, some USD 292.16 million has been approved for the execution of 5,450 social programs: housing, communes and infrastructure development, among others, a representative of the regional commune office informed.

Lack of legal status constrains execution

A spokesperson from the National Network of Commune Members explained that unlike Lara state, where 40 communes are on their way to their incorporation, in nearby states Portuguesa and Yaracuy, incorporated communes have not been able to receive their certificate. "This limits the execution of social-productive projects such as the creation of the communal bank, which bridges the gap to incorporate the communal currency, although it is not indispensable."

Translated by Jhean Cabrera
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