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Chávez lashes out at Bush at the UN


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Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez sips coffee during his press conference at UN headquarters on September 20 (Photo: AP)

Chávez proposes to reorganize United Nations
Approximately at 11:15 a.m. on Wednesday, President Hugo Chávez started his speech at the United Nations (UN) 61st General Assembly. There, he criticized the remarks made Tuesday by US President George W. Bush, the US imperialist policy and shelling on Lebanon and the Middle East.

In his view, the UN system, born after World War II "collapsed and does not work."

"They have turned us in a merely deliberative body with no power at all."

As in the prior General Assembly, the head of state proposed to reorganize the UN; enlarge the number of both permanent and temporary members of the Security Council, in order to include developed and developing countries; implement effective, transparent methods to solve international conflicts, and "removal of this anti-democratic mechanism, which is the veto on the decisions of the Security Council."

During his speech that took more than 20 minutes, Chávez favored strengthening the incumbency of the UN Secretary General and blamed the US Government for protection of "terrorism and taking a cynical stance."

The White House ignores Chávez comments
Comments of President Hugo Chávez "do not deserve any reply," the White House said Wednesday.

During a speech delivered at the United Nations 61st General Assembly, President Hugo Chávez called "devil" US President George W. Bush.

"Such words do not bear any comment at all," Spokesman Fred Jones said. During his speech, Chávez urged the world to repeal US hegemonic attempts that endanger the planet. He asserted that US imperialist claims and strategies are the biggest threat in the world.

"The devil is at home. Yesterday (Tuesday) the devil came here. This place smells sulfur," Chávez stated in reference to Bush's attendance at the General Assembly.

US ambassador rejects Chávez' claims
US Ambassador to Venezuela William Brownfield commented on Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez' speech at the United Nations (UN) 61st General Assembly, saying that he "has every right to express his views, and I think that it comes as no surprise that this humble servant and the Government I represent do not share some of his views."

Brownfield added that "the decision to label someone as the devil is something more suitable for the Church and less so for governments, in that matter."

During his speech at the UN 61st General Assembly, President Chávez called "the devil" US President George W. Bush.

President Chávez asks US people to transform their country
Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez wants US people to "wake up, fight within the society to change the government and transform the country for the sake of humankind." His comments were made during a rally on Wednesday night in New York City, AFP quoted.

Framed by Venezuelan and US flags that were delivered to the audience in a set of souvenirs at the beginning of the event, the head of state was cheered by people chanting "Watch out, Bolivar's sword walks down Latin America," or "Uh, ah, Chávez is not leaving!"

Invited by the study center Cooper's Union of New York, Chávez took outside of the United Nations (UN) building some of the verbal attacks made hours earlier at the General Assembly.

Again, he called US President George W. Bush a "genocidal" and suggested that he should face trial in an international court. About 600 people, most of them Latin American residents and some US citizens, acclaimed the proposal.

Craddock fears Chávez exporting instability
The United States is worried about "export of instability" from Venezuela, a US high commander said. In his opinion, the large amount of money from oil drilling enables Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez to buy influence.
 
General Bantz Craddock made such remark during an interview shortly after a speech delivered by Chávez at the United Nations (UN) General Assembly in New York. There, the head of state labeled his US counterpart George W. Bush as "the devil."

"I think instability is being exported from Venezuela. There is abundance of petrodollars and buying influence is possible," Craddock lamented.

"Therefore, I think we ought to take it seriously," the US military added.

President Chávez willing to make energy deal with US
During a ceremony to launch a program on provision of heating oil for the poor and indigenous communities in the United States, President Hugo Chávez voiced interest in a cooperation energy agreement with the United States.

"I have not given up hope of making friends with a US president, governors, and mayors. We are not enemies of the United States. We are friends of the US people and want to find ways for cooperation," he reasoned.

However, he called his US counterpart George W. Bush "alcoholic; an insane guy having a complex, but he is dangerous because he is much powerful."
 
In his view, governments around the world, "instead of plotting invasion and aggression," should seat down and talk.

EU Commissioner regrets President Chávez remarks at UN
A speech delivered by Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez at the United Nations (UN) General Assembly, where he labeled his US counterpart George W. Bush as the devil, was unworthy, European Commissioner for External Relations and European Neighborhood Policy, Benita Ferrero-Waldner said Thursday.

"I think that this does not deserve any comment at all. It is unworthy," the senior official declared during a telephone conversation with Efe in New York.

During his speech in the UN General Assembly plenary session last Wednesday, Chávez urged the world to stand up against US hegemonic attempts that, in his view, jeopardize the planet.

"The devil is at home. Yesterday (Tuesday) the devil came here. This place smells sulfur," Chávez stated in reference to Bush.

Claims of secret service trying to prevent President Chávez' presentation in Harlem
While Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez was talking to residents of Harlem in New York City, "the US secret service tried to prevent the activity from taking place," ex Foreign Vice-minister Mari Pili Hernández told TV news channel Globovisión.

According to Hernández, who spoke with a reporter of TV channel Telesur, the "secret service" argued lack of clearance needed for the event, but "the people in the community showed up and prove that this was not true, because it was also an act inside a Baptist church."

Additionally, Hernández said, the reporter claimed that the secret service tried to jam the satellite signal of official TV channel Venezolana de Televisión (VTV).

Chávez went to Harlem to announce the extension of a program on cheap heating oil for underprivileged communities in the United States.

Reverend Jackson asks Chávez and Bush to come to terms
US Reverend Jesse Jackson met Thursday night with Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez and suggested that both Chávez and his US counterpart George W. Bush need to lower the tone and prevent insults, AP reported.

"Of course, Chávez feels that the US Government is trying to topple him. But my advice for him is that he should be above rage," Jackson said.

"I think that Chávez should not call President Bush 'the devil.' And President Bush should not call him a 'tyrant.' We need to cease hostilities," Jackson added.

Bush's critics rebut Chávez' remarks
The Democrat opposition joined ruling Republicans to regret a speech delivered by Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez at the United Nations (UN) General Assembly. On that occasion, Chávez called his US counterpart George W. Bush "the devil."

"I would highly appreciate it if President Chávez could understand that while many people in the United States are critic of our President, we do not like him coming to the United Nations and criticizing President Bush," Democrat Representative Charles Rangel explained.

Revered Jesse Jackson held a meeting Thursday night with Chávez and suggested that both parties should lower the tone and prevent insults.

"Of course, Chávez feels that the US Government is trying to topple him. But my advice for him is that he should be above rage," Jackson said.

Noam Chomsky wants to meet President Chávez
US author Noam Chomsky would like to meet Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez, as he has quoted time after time one of his works to lash out at US imperialism, the writer told The New York Times, as published Friday.

"I would be pleased to meet him," Chomsky, 77, said. He claimed to have received "10,000 e-mails" since Chávez recommended his book "Hegemony or Survival: America's Quest for Global Dominance" during a speech delivered at the United Nations (UN) General Assembly, AFP quoted.

Chomsky stated that he would not use the same terms of "alcoholic, tyrant and insane," as Chávez labeled his US counterpart George W. Bush, but understands Chávez' rage.

"The Bush's Administration backed a coup to overthrow his government," he explained.

President Chávez willing to be the "super star"
Venezuelan international analysts fear that President Hugo Chávez would like to become the "super star" of the confrontation with the United States following his controversial remarks both at the United Nations (UN) General Assembly and in New York City.

According to Venezuelan ex ambassador to UN Milos Alcalay, Chávez' stance results in "unbalance" damaging the country, DPA quoted.

"The President's behavior, by wanting to become a super star is an unbalance and does not benefit the country. Radicalization is endless and they intend to put Venezuela as the center of the world," he told Unión Radio.

During a speech delivered in a church located in Harlem, Chávez called his US counterpart George W. Bush "alcoholic, insane and having a complex."